Tag Archives: “infra red”

Burn Forest Burn

Posting about bucolic English countryside is all well and good (check it out: here), but for the opposite of Constable-esque pastoral it’s fun to whizz over to America. These images are from Bryce Canyon. Not the classic views, everyone does those – me too: here – rather these are looking away from the Canyon ridge, back down into the forest. And what a sight. Death and destruction everywhere…

Desolation amongst the trees

Desolation amongst the trees

Ponderosa pine, dead

Ponderosa pine, dead

These images are infra red, converted to black/white. They become punchier, contrastier. Starker. Suits the mood of the wounded forest…

Smashed apart by fire

Burnt

This tree will not recover

No recovery

Starkness

Nothing left

But even though the forest has been scarred by the lightning fires, there is still hope. The fire was in ’09, and slowly the forest is recovering. This is Bryce last autumn. So after 5 years there are new shoots. The forest never gives up, hope springs eternal. The reflectance of foliage in infra red means it goes white – exuberant and new. Rather fitting, I think…

new life

new life


Catching whispers on the Kent coast.

Now the photographic judge at the competition didn’t like this one at all. “Too much lens flare”. Knob, I thought, it’s supposed to be there, and it has meaning…

 

Catching sound waves

Catching sound waves

 

These are the sound mirrors at Denge in Kent. Designed to catch the sound of incoming aircraft before the invention of radar made them redundant.

Concrete whisper catchers

Concrete whisper catchers

 

Imagine that, a faint whisper in the skies above France and the hope to hear it on the shores of Kent. What ingenuity!

 

Parabolic beauty

Parabolic beauty

 

A curve to capture sound

A curve to capture sound

 

But how to photograph a whisper and a sound? Well I substituted one wavelength for another, and pictured light instead of sound waves. Now the judge knew these were sound mirrors, but he didn’t get the analogy. So much for the judge, they always default to cliche anyway (too much lens flare indeed…).

 

Catching the sound waves on camera...

Catching the sound waves on camera…

 

If you liked this, check out these…


The oddest beach in the world

Last week was abstract in the Hebrides. This week is more literal, but also more weird. A boat graveyard on a Kent beach. Dungeness – the oddest beach in the world.

Beached boat

Beached boat

 

Junk, detritus, and decaying boats. Pretty deserted at 7am on a Sunday morning, which added to the atmosphere. Isolation & stillness. I loved it!

No more fishing...

No more fishing…

 

Now photographers are well known for being attracted to a bit of junk and decay – makes for great textures and patterns, and that was certainly in abundance here. And I wanted to make my pictures slightly weird too, so out came the IR camera. I think it adds an extra element to the style of the images.

green seaweed turned white

green seaweed turned white

The camera is a revelation. I can shoot images that just weren’t possible before. Like this one, straight into the sun. A beach with a difference, matched by a camera with a difference. How about that – liberation surrounded by decay. Weird or what! I wonder what you think… Let me know.

 

The sun shines on a dead boat.

The sun shines on a dead boat.


The Minster in all its glory

I grew up in York. Of course as a kid I didn’t see the beauty of the city, especially the Minster. It was just there. I think I only really began to see it when I left. And now, when I go back, I look more closely.

Minster view...

Minster view…

 

I’m going to do a project of photographing the Minster. Up close, inside and out. This is the first post – views from a little way away. Seeing it through the snickleways of the city.

Grape Lane

Grape Lane

 

I’ve also been having some fun with an old camera that I’ve converted to infra red. I like a subtle IR effect, not too over the top. You can just about tell from the foliage when it appears in these photos. Whiter than normal.

Medieval cobbles

Medieval cobbles

 

Chimney Street

Chimney Street

 

York looks absolutely stunning at the moment, especially early in the morning before everyone crowds the city. And the Minster is its crowning glory. The ancestors would be proud.

Minster at dawn

Minster at dawn

 

 

View from Petergate

View from Petergate

(By the way, one of these photos is a cheat, an odd one out. Can you tell which, and why?)


Football vs photography. No contest!

There is one good thing about an early exit from the World Cup – more time for photography!

Golding's Pond

Golding’s Pond

 

I managed to spend a couple of hours in the forest this morning, processed and published the pictures by the evening. The benefits of digital!

Wake Valley Pond

Wake Valley Pond

Apparently, this pond is infested with terrapins, one of which is meant to be a giant. That’s according to the angler that I chatted to. Mind you, we all know how anglers have a tendency to exaggerate, especially about size…

Sun, reflecting.

Sun, reflecting.

 

Perhaps he's under the lily pads?

Terrapin, lurking out there somewhere…

Photography vs football. No contest at all. The one gives pleasure, the other pain. I’ll concentrate on the picture making, and the hunt for terrapins!

 

(By the way, I have a series of articles being published in Black + White Photography on the why certain images create an emotional impact. Check them out and let me know what you think)