Tag Archives: “Black and White”‘

Northumberland Castles, Seascapes, Big Skies and Roman Walls

Northumberland is a fantastic windswept rugged landscape. Big beaches, huge sky, imposing castles. A great area for photography, which is why I’m running a workshop there next year. I’ve just been on a quick recce to check out the locations. Here are a few resulting images.

Bamburgh Castle, a classic dawn and dusk location. Great for big land, and seascapes, beach reflections and rocky lead-in lines…

Alnwick Castle, home to much Harry Potter castle filming…

 

Holy Island and its famous boat sheds. Normally this is a great shot with Lindisfarne in the background, but scaffolding on the castle put paid to that this time (scaffolding that will be removed before the workshop thank heavens!)

Pilgrim’s Way across the mud flats of the estuary to Holy Island. I kept my feet dry and resisted splashing around in the mud…

Abstracts and long exposure in Berwick upon Tweed…

A day away from the seaside checking out Roughting Linn waterfall

No trip to Northumberland should be without a visit to Hadrian’s Wall. The Roman soldiers must have shivered and longed for return to the continent when they were posted here…

And finally, the famous Sycamore Gap on Hadrian’s Wall. Much photographed, but stunning nevertheless. Great location!

If you are interested in a trip to Northumberland, the workshop is 6th – 10th September 2018. Contact me at thomaspeck1@mac.com for more details or to request a brochure.  Stunning landscapes guaranteed.


Is Marseille really French…?

Is Marseille really French I wonder…? It’s such a brilliant hotchpotch of different styles, cultures and colours. Really it’s a bit of everything. Maybe the old greek Massalia-polis attitude lives on? Origins aren’t important, attitudes are. And Marseille has such a fantastic mixture of old and new. It’s a great city no doubt, and a couple of days work on the south coast of France never hurt anyone…

Here’s the old city, the Vieux Port, still looking good in spite of the stains on the mirror:

The basilica looks Moroccan, or a bit Eastern…., slightly Turkish…

 

The combination of old and new is very French, and in Marseille it’s done with great style. Here’s the single metal strip walkway bridge juxtaposed with the old port watch-tower.

 

The stunning Museum of the Mediterranean, closed on Tuesdays, because we are after all in France, so I couldn’t actually visit it…

 

 

 

There’s even a Brit influence in Marseille. Every French town has a covered market, but Marseille has a Norman Foster glossy mirrored-ceiling version.. Take a look, this is the right way up…

And so, back to the hotel for a very French breakfast with my traductrice, Jo Hair: animal artist extraordinary If you like a penguin, you’ll love this, check the link

(And finally, why did the Brits stick an “-s” on the end of Marseille…, Marseilles? Typical Brit sort of thing to do of course…)


The Best Martini in the World, Dukes Bar, London

Now I’m rather partial to a nice glass of wine. But Roger goes whizzbang for a Martini. So to celebrate his birthday, Mrs Roger invited us to pay our respects at the home of the Martini in London, and drink the best at Dukes Bar in St James under the tutelage of Mr Alessandro Palazzi.

It is always a delight to learn from the hands of an expert, and Alessandro is an enthusiast, a connoisseur and a virtuoso. And Dukes Bar is the quintessential place for a Martini. This is where Ian Fleming came to drink, and Bond would have come to relax. Alessandro would have been behind the bar.

His secret of course is to have the best ingredients. Only the best London dry gin, English vermouth, and lemons from the Amalfi coast. Alessandro advice: Shaken, not stirred, is of course Bond’s take on a Martini, but the classic would never be shaken – the ice would dilute the alcohol. Bond was a rebel after all…

Now Mrs P’s favourite Martini was a Strangway – elderflower infusion, so…. lady…; but I think I enjoyed the Vesper the most: 3 parts No 3 Gin – frozen, 1 part Potocki vodka – frozen (Polish vodka – Fleming based Vesper on a real Polish spy, so Polish it must be…), 1 part Lillet Blanc, 2 dashes Angostura Bitters. A heady drink for an intoxicating character. Delicious. Deadly.

And the result? Much enthusiasm from the audience, and I haven’t seen Roger wobble quite so much on leaving a bar since he was a student… Bond, of course, would have remained ice cool…

If you get the chance, go to Dukes Bar, and indulge in the heady drinks of the Cold War: https://www.dukeshotel.com/dukes-bar/

 


But which ones to choose…?

Right, I need some help. We have a club competition coming up this week. A prestigious cup, no less, is on offer. The Bedwell Trophy, for the best panel of 4 images. And my problem is which 4 to choose….

Obvs they need to be themed, and I’ve gone for “Long Exposure at More London”. But I’ve got 5 images, and I can’t make up my mind. I only can take 4. Above is ‘Shard 1’, below is ‘City Hall’, I think they top and tail quite nicely…

But then there’s ‘Skyline Shard’ which is a good scene setter:

Finally, I have two more abstract-y images. Do I go with both, or just one…? They are ‘London Office Block’ and ‘Reflection’:

So, which should I choose for my 4? Anyone care to help me out? Have a vote below for which image to leave out?

(Remember to check out more of my photos on Instagram: thomaspeck or twitter @Peckster68)


Modernist bridges in The Netherlands

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The Netherlands has got a lot of bridges, for obvious reasons… And whilst I like a quaint hump-backed stone bridge over a quiet canal in Amsterdam, I think I prefer the smack-in-your-face modernist Über-bridges dotted elsewhere around the country. Take this one by Spanish architect Calatrava. It’s a bridge that looks more like a space rocket. Aesthetics on top of functionality. Awesome!

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The Dutch have been building modernist bridges since the 50s. This is the super-sleek Zeeland Bridge spanning the Osterschelde estuary. Over 5kms long…

And here’s another Calatrava. He does like his pointy bits, doesn’t he? Makes for quite a photograph though…

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Sharp lines and chiaroscuro in London and Rotterdam!

I have been having some fun converting  pictures! With the expert help of my friend Noel (check out his website here) I’ve been experimenting with luminosity masks, superior selections, and 8 minute sky exposures. Dramatic and I love it! Here’s London, looking sharp…

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And give me a Dutch bridge and this is what I do to it:

 

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Perhaps the most photogenic city for modern architecture however is Rotterdam, see below. And it’s got a fine modern art museum. Noel tells me his wife tells him that the shopping is superlative too. Excellent. Mrs P will have something to do on our next weekend away whilst I get on with the image making!

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Faces of the future

I did a shoot at a theatre company the other day. I loved the eagerness of the actors – the faces of the future. Here they are, blimey they look so young!

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Michelle, grace and elegance

If Ruben soars, then Michelle glides, graceful and elegant. The arch of the foot, the point of the hand. Arabesque, Plié, Pirouette…

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There’s time for fun, a little – it can’t be all too serious.


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Perfection must be to the fingertips, to the toes. A body under control.

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Ruben and Michelle make dance look effortless, controlled and beautiful. They look serene, together.

 

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For pictures of Ruben, see previous post.


Ruben dancing into the air

Now I know that I have published the odd post featuring the female form. Beautiful it is too, and I’ve loved every moment of every photo shoot. But maybe it’s time to even up the score… So here are some images of the male form, and in spectacular condition too. This is Ruben, a man who can soar, seemingly effortlessly, through the air.

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How many hours of practice does it take to be able to do this? They say 10,000 to master an instrument. This is a life’s dedication. So it’s great to record the beauty of Ruben’s skill.

 

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Unsurprisingly, the feet take some wear and tear. But a short rest and then Ruben is ready to fly again. Up, up and away. Amazing….

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2 speedlights, background, and a model…

Amazing what you can do with a couple of speedlights. Basic kit – 2 small flashes, 2 strip boxes, a background – and a model of course! and hey, it’s up and running…

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These are from a workshop I did the other day with Luca Monti – check out his workshops here. Going on a workshop is a great way of stepping out of the comfort zone and doing something different. Just do it, and have some fun.

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The next image is one I put into a competition. The judge slated it – too much negative space, according to him. I don’t agree. I rather like the curves and the space. They balance off one another. Let me know what you think!

 

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